The Scientific Basis of the CANS-MCI Blog

  • International Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders, 2002

    By on July 17, 2016

    265 elderly volunteers were enrolled in a 3-year longitudinal NIA-funded study to test the CANS-MCI for screening test usability in primary care, validity & reliability. Fndings from baseline MCI test screen data were presented.

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  • Initial Validation of the CANS-MCI (2005)

    By on June 30, 2016

    The CANS-MCI, a computer administered, scored, and interpreted touch screen battery, was evaluated for its ability to screen for mild cognitive impairment. 310 community-dwelling elders enrolled in an NIA-funded study.

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  • The Validity of the CANS-MCI II (2005 – 2014)

    By on June 22, 2016

    Scores on the CANS-MCI were compared with the results of full neuropsychological examinations that were blind to the CANS-MCI results. Identical analyses were performed using full independent neuropsychological evaluation classifications on the 74 subjects who returned a year later.

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  • The CANS-MCI for the Assessment of Alzheimer’s Risk

    By on May 30, 2016

    A very recently published study of the most significant predictors of progression from MCI to Alzheimer’s indicates, albeit indirectly, that the CANS-MCI is a very powerful tool for the detection of those predictors. The CANS-MCI was designed to measure all of the cognitive domains known to be most predictive of Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

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  • The CANS-MCI for Concussion Assessment

    By on May 24, 2016

    The early detection of cognitive ability changes due to sports concussion is critical because of the increased vulnerability that follows a concussion. The most neglected but critical aspect of sports-related cognitive ability testing is the bias of testers. The CANS-MCI is entirely self-administered.

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